Joan Vinall-Cox recommended reading Konrad Glogowski blog post Digital Pioneers… so I did. What a beauty! Konrad adds a quietly powerful voice to the discussion around new ‘digital’ literacies, proposing in his title an alternative view to the idea of digital immigrant/native.

Lawrence Lessig says that creativity and innovation always builds on the past. This is exactly what we’re doing when we introduce our children to the digital world. Our role as educators, to paraphrase Lessig, is to ensure that the past, the linear, visual mode of thinking give rise to but does not limit the creativity and the energy of emerging technologies. This can happen only if we recognize that we cannot impose the old upon the new just as we cannot create the new in a vacuum. It is our job to ensure that our students acquire the skills necessary to intelligently share their views, whether it’s in a wiki, an every-day conversation, or a traditional five-paragraph essay. We need to ensure, as Prensky suggests, that they learn both the legacy and future content. To do that, we need to acquire the skills of digital pioneers, we need to remix and feed forward.

While I couldn’t help wading into the generational generalisation war last week, Konrad offers a more considered account, drawing from a good range of voices.


Creative Commons Licence

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons (Attribution) license.

–>